asthma in indiana

the indiana joint asthma coalition

mission

To develop and advocate for policies, practices and system changes that address long term results, behavior changes and sustainability of asthma programming.

Study finds link between low neighborhood walkability and childhood asthma

Children living in neighborhoods that are not conducive to walking are more likely to develop asthma and to continue to have this condition through later childhood, according to a new study published in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

In “Associations Between Neighborhood Walkability and Incident and Ongoing Asthma in Children,” researchers from Toronto’s Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) and the University of Toronto evaluated associations between home neighborhood walkability and both the incidence of asthma and its ongoing occurrence.

Although there have been studies of neighborhood walkability and chronic diseases such as diabetes in adults, this large, long-term study is believed to be the first to look at walkability and childhood asthma.

“We found that children living in neighborhoods with low walkability were more likely to develop asthma and to continue to have asthma during later childhood,” said lead author, Dr. Elinor Simons, a pediatric allergist and clinician scientist who now works at the University of Manitoba and Children’s Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba, Canada. “These findings show a relationship between lack of day-to-day physical activity or sedentary lifestyle and development of new and ongoing asthma in Toronto children.”

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asthma

fast facts

In the last decade, the number of people with asthma increased by 15%.

For the period 2008–2010, asthma prevalence was higher among children than adults.

About 70% of asthmatics also have allergies.

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